You are here

Dr Annie Mckee

Dr Annie Mckee

Annie Mckee

 +44 (0)344 928 5428 

  annie.mckee@hutton.ac.uk

The James Hutton Institute

Craigiebuckler

Aberdeen

AB15 8QH

 

Biography

Annie is a social researcher in land management in the Social Economic and Geographical Sciences Group (SEGS). Annie's background is in geography, environmental management and sustainable development, with previous dissertation research exploring public perceptions of red deer management and sustainable rural communities.

Annie's research interests include stakeholder and community engagement practices, rural governance and institutions, land management and land use policy, sustainable game management, the impact of land reform, rural community development and achieving sustainable development in rural areas. Annie has developed extensive knowledge and understanding of landownership and estate management systems through her PhD research (Thesis title: ‘The role of private landownership in contributing to sustainable rural communities in upland Scotland’), contributing to the ‘Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century’ project.

Annie also has significant experience of qualitative data collection and analysis, utilising methods such as ethnography, participant observation, semi-structured and autobiographical interviewing, and adopting action research and transdisciplinary approaches. She has developed proficient workshop facilitation skills through research roles in the HUNTing for Sustainability and FarmPath FP7 projects, amongst others, including contributing to the Scottish Government’s Strategic Research Programme (2011 – 2016 and 2016 – 2021 (ongoing)), under the themes of ‘rural economy adaptation to key external drivers’ (Work Package 2.4.2) and 'local assets, local decisions and community resilience' (Work Package 3.4.4).

Area of Expertise

  • Land and Communities
  • Community Resilience

Delivery Framework

  • Theme 3: Food, Health and Wellbeing
  • 3.4 - Communities and Wellbeing
  • 3.4.4 Local assets, local decisions and community resilience